Did you know that the Chilean Horse is the only American stock horse that has maintained a closed registry that has not been purposely crossed with any other breed before or after its formal registration started in 1893? Like many other Creole breeds across Latin America, the Chilean Creole is extremely strong. It has a low metabolism, a high threshold for discomfort, a great immunity to disease and a remarkable rate of recuperation. Their hooves are strong and their thick double hair coat makes them well suited for both cold and dry/hot weather. It is doubtful any other breed surpasses their productive energy level. Although abundant manes, tails and forelocks are characteristic of all Iberian breeds in the Americas, none can compare with the volume and thickness that typifies a good Chilean Creole specimen. 

All breeds of Iberian origin also have some incidence of semi-convex facial profiles, but the Chilean Creole breeders proudly state their preference for this characteristic. It is truly ironic that a breed like the Chilean Creole is virtually unknown to anyone outside of the meridian South America. The fact is that this breed is the oldest registered Creole breed, the oldest registered horse breed of South America, the oldest registered stock horse breed in all the Americas and the third oldest horse breed of any kind in all the Western Hemisphere. This "antiquity" comes from the fact that the Chilean Horse registry was officially inaugurated in 1893 when formalizing breed status was still a new concept in the Americas. The maximum stability in the huaso seat comes from pushing the heels down against the extended stirrups, while pressing the lower back against the cantle. It must be remembered that the allocation of weight in huaso equitation is balancing pressures in front and behind the centre of gravity, rather than concentrating all the weight distribution in a column over it. The modern Chilean saddles now offer more support for the body so that the rider can make these opposing pressures that secure his position in the unpredictable clashes with the pinned steer.